Illegal Mexico Reason To Come North MEO L.A.M. Norman Oetker Missionary “The Light Amidst the Mong/MEO” Hmong Thailand, Reynosa Mexico, English Class, St. Charles Missouri US.

 Illegals  Mexico MEO L.A.M. Norman Oetker Missionary “The Light Amidst the Mong/MEO” Hmong Thailand, Reynosa Mexico, English Class, St. Charles Missouri US. 

 CONTACT: normanoetker@hotmail.com  October 2009 

 

October 2008

A Good Life In Mexico For Mexican Nationals

The Mexican Dream Is A Fact, And A Way Of Life.

The Illegally Entering People, that are passing through Mexico to the U.S., are they looking to work in the fields of the US in 2008?

  • The legally entering Mexicans are that legal, they will work the seasonal jobs, then return to Mexico.
  • The majorities of Mexicans, choose to live and remain in their country, a proud spirit of being Mexican, runs throughout the country.
  • Multitudes Remain In Mexico and live a very comfortable life, in the border regions, working in any of the two thousand eight hundred companies in the multi-national plants within their border areas.
  • There Are Millions in the northern Mexico areas along the Mexican U.S. border from California to Texas.
  • Trained And Cross Trained, then working within the various jobs applications, where semi skilled to skill professionals are utilized.
  • Production assembly of quality products, in one of the most highly technically advanced work centers globally.
  • The Quality, And High Standards that are required, for a continual market share by meeting the international community requirements, for quality goods and materials is essential, for long term growth and economic prosperity.
  • The Standards Required, within these industrial parks, located within Mexico, are under intense market driven pressures, competing in a world wide, work forces, with this global incentives, and that being, with all wanting, an ever greater Global share.
  • Mexico Has Demonstrated, and will continue to meet the global challenges, in their expanding worldwide exports sales.
  • Their Global Work Skills Proficiency levels have enabled them to be in high demand by the International Employers.
  • The Mexican Nationals, with schooling, and training, coupled with language learning skills, with English being a primary targeted language, are realizing through their hard work, and further commitments, the
  • “Mexican Dream” of a better life, for them, and their children, and being a voice of change within  Mexico’s Global Workforce Community.
  •  
  • N. Oetker… As One Reads Through The Pages Below, it will become evident, that those who venture to north Mexico, on their illegal way to the U.S. will have contact with million’s of middle class, successful Mexican citizens, who are succeeding in their quest, for a better life and life-style in “MEXICO.” 
  • According To NAFTA’s report below there are 2,808 international factories in Mexico, it will become very clear that these are specialized jobs, and that the locals, have invested in themselves, by attending local government initiated technical schools to help them in attaining the work-skills necessary to compete in the global workplace, which requires the production of consistent quality parts.
  • The question for discussion is not that there aren’t jobs in Mexico but, what is the real motivation for illegal immigration activity?
  • As with all things of Mexico, it will be the Mexicans that will need to step forward and address the truth’s of this issue also.    

SOURCE NAFTA 2005 -2006 PRESENT AND BEYOND

http://www.teamnafta.com/ssp/2008_site_selection_package.pdf

  THE MANUFACTURING EXPORT INDUSTRY

In 1965 the Mexican Government Established the in-bond or maquiladora (INDUSTRIAL PARKS) program, a program that allows duty-free importation of raw materials, components and equipment needed for the assembly or manufacture of finished goods for subsequent export. The program originated from the need to industrialize northern Mexico and slowdown migration to the U.S. by creating jobs along the border.

There are 2,808 Maquiladora companies operating in Mexico with nearly 90% of them in the border zone. The maquiladora industry currently employs 1,181,284 people. In Ciudad (City) Juarez alone, the industry employs 231,000 people.

 

  • N. Oetker footnote this city Juarez, according to local news, currently is controlled mostly through fear and intimidation from drug cartels and corrupt officials. The newly elected administration in Mexico, has disarmed the local police in these border regions and have sent in the military…. the axiom holds true and that is, “if you want to find the problems, follow the money.”
  •  
  • According To The Auto Industry Association (AMIA), Mexican auto production expanded 6.6% in 2005 to 1.6 million units, while exports rose 8.4% to 1.2 million units. It is important to point out that the automotive sector already accounts for more than 20% of total manufacturing output.

 

·         NAFTA in Numbers

·         Since 1993, the year before NAFTA went into effect, the total volume of trade between the three NAFTA countries has expanded from $294 billion to $1.149 trillion in 2006.

  • Each Day NAFTA Members Conduct Nearly $2.1 billion in Trilateral Trade.

(Source: Secretaria de Economia, Banco de a, US Department of Commerce) MEXICO FOREIGN TRADE

Mexico’s Exports Have Grown exponentially since NAFTAs inception and the country has been consolidating as a major exporter to the US. During 2007, Mexico exported $194 billion, nearly equalling the all-time high from 2006 of $198 billion, and a big leap over 1993 levels, the year prior to NAFTA implementation, when it exported $39 billion.

In 2007, Mexico’s Trade surplus with the United States reached $67.7 billion US dollars, the highest surplus ever.

Sales from Mexico to the United States have increased $59.4 billion between 2002 and 2007. Immediate access to the US is a primary advantage for companies producing products that require tight logistical time frames to re-enter the US, heavy products that have high transportation costs and where quality is more important than price.

 

THE MANUFACTURING EXPORT INDUSTRY

In 1965 the Mexican Government Established the in-bond or maquiladora program, a program that allows duty-free importation of raw materials, components and equipment needed for the assembly or manufacture of finished goods for subsequent export. The program originated from the need to industrialize northern Mexico and slowdown migration to the U.S. by creating jobs along the border.

There are 2,808 maquiladora companies operating in Mexico with nearly 90% of them in the border zone. The  maquiladora industry currently employs 1,181,284 people. In Ciudad Juarez alone, the industry employs 231,000 people.

 

MAQUILADORA EXPORTS

Exports in the maquiladora industry reached $94 billion in 2005. The main exports of the maquiladora industry include machinery, electric appliances and materials, sound and image recording devices,TV sets, mechanic devices, optical instruments and devices, photography, precision control and medical instruments, vehicles, plastic manufactures, and garments and accessories.

According  to the Auto Industry Association (AMIA), Mexican auto production expanded 6.6% in 2005 to 1.6 million units, while exports rose 8.4% to 1.2 million units. It is important to point out that the automotive sector already accounts for more than 20% of total manufacturing output.

MEO L.A.M. Norman Oetker Missionary “The Light Amidst the Mong/MEO” Hmong Thailand, Reynosa Mexico, English Class, St. Charles Missouri US.

Periferico Plaza MEO L.A.M. Norman Oetker Missionary “The Light Amidst the Mong/MEO” Hmong Thailand, Reynosa Mexico, English Class, St. Charles Missouri US.
Faith’s Journey Surrender Of Our Will Norman Oetker .. English Class Reynosa Mae Hong Son Thailand Mexico St. Charles Missouri Hmong Missionary. Total Surrender Of Our Will