Possible Answer To Job Loss To Mexico Norman Oetker English Class Reynosa Mae Hong Son Thailand Mexico St. Charles Missouri Hmong Missionary

Job Loss  MEO L.A.M. Norman Oetker Missionary "The Light Amidst the Mong/MEO" Hmong Thailand, Reynosa Mexico, English Class, St. Charles Missoui US.

 WANTED… A WRITER FOR A BOOK ON MY LIFE AS A CHRISTIAN MISSIONARY

CONTACT: normanoetker@hotmail.com  October 2009

 
 
 
  • Possible Answer To Job Lost From US. to Reynosa Mexico Norman Oetker English Class Reynosa Mae Hong Son Thailand Mexico St. Charles Missouri Hmong Missionary

  • Panasonic Pondering Future Of Knoxville Plant In US.

  • Missionary Norman Oetker wrote:

  • I have been living here in Reynosa Mexico for three years, were some of the American and other international jobs have gone, and are going.

  • I have Panasonic workers, -as well as many others from different US. and other international based companies,- for students here at my home in Reynosa MK., I help them in speaking English.

  • I’m a Christian Missionary. I have lived in the cities of Asia, the Himalayan Mountains, and many places in the states.

  • I’m saddened to see, and read about the lost jobs, in the American papers to Mexico and to other countries.

  • I do believe they could be saved, but it will take some belt tightening, good negotiating, and a continual ‘fundamental change’ in the way of doing things.

  • This is a very hard lesson for American workers to understand, that is ‘change’, as demonstrated by the loss of US made cars sales, along with parts supplied, to other countries, to name a few.

  • A fundamental change in attitude to ‘change’, has now created a clearer understanding of market change and adaptation. As the American workforce has had to adapt to other ideals, foreign to the US. along with their concepts, eventually leading to a more efficient market based sales approach.

  • The central dominant factor is the GWPP (global workforce profitability problem.)

  • (GWPP is phrase I coined, it is the low wage earner of other countries. Norm)

  • A proposed concept used in Asia, is a model developed over thousands of years.  Differing ethnic groups have a cultural practice, that would work in this GWPP situation.

  • Within this group- as well as others- there is one person, for a region, that is appointed and agree upon by all others of the groups involved.

  • His job is to bring reconciliation into play to all parties concern.

  • The job is to resolve, not to let things go undone, are to deteriorate to the point where all is lost. This person comes with sets’ of compromises’ which appease all concerned.

  • This individual is well aware of the entire situation wherein he is asked to intervene.

  • He has total access to both parties involved, and in the end, fully understands the financial, national, emotional, and family components parts.  (parts of this concept is used in Japan’s workplace)

  • This concept, is contrary to the general US. union’s positions, were only one side is represented, this is a handicap to those with whom they represent.

  • A no budge, demanding concept is played out, to only, in the long run, be financially compensated by the lost of other manufacturing parts suppliers to the GWPP- global work-force which is at a lower pay scale.

  • As with the car manufacturing change-model…so another change-model needs to be implemented to address the GWPP- global-workforce phenomenon.

  • A new change-model, will lead to many solutions of ending- this complex problem within industry, and the GWPP-global workforce profitability problem.

  • This fundamental change model will in essence, halt this outsourcing to other countries.

  • This is a resolvable problem.

  • Complex, with many varied components, however, it could be resolved with all parties concerned.

  • The model mentioned above, and have witness, works for the betterment of all involved.

  • If one observes within the states, there are multi-million companies, that un-knowingly incorporate similar parts of these strategies.

  • Norman Oetker English Class Reynosa Mae Hong Son Thailand Mexico St. Charles Missouri Hmong Missionary


God And The Two Sons Norman Oetker English Class Reynosa Mae Hong Son Thailand Mexico St. Charles Missouri Hmong Missionary

  • Two Sons MEO L.A.M. Norman Oetker Missionary "The Light Amidst the Mong/MEO" Hmong Thailand, Reynosa Mexico, English Class, St. Charles Missouri US.

     WANTED… A WRITER FOR A BOOK ON MY LIFE AS A CHRISTIAN MISSIONARY

    CONTACT: normanoetker@hotmail.com  October 2009

     
     

     

  • Cain And Abel,  Life And Death 

November 2008 Reynosa Mexico

  • Missionary Norman Oetker

  • Thanksgiving Christmas  

  • GOD 

  • The Two Son’s Made Their Offerings, one is accepted by God the other isn’t.

  • Accordingly, how did these two- the first children recorded in the Bible- obtain the knowledge to make and offering to God in the first place?

  • Consequently, why was the one accepted and the other wasn’t?

  • Therefore, This Incident Has Raised The Thought that these two son’s had an awareness of God, and each made a choice. However, an inward attitudes of their hearts made one acceptable to God, and the other wasn’t.

  • Each son was born- as all peoples of the earth- in Sin.

  • Sin’s power is the controlling factor in all; in addition, man is unable to break free of it’s hold over their lives.

  • Namely,this controlling factor (sin) was what God was speaking of, when He was talking with Adam and Eve in the garden, after their transgression.

  •  

  • Sin, "This Power Over All People" Would Be Crushed In The Future.

  •  

  • Faith, Demonstrated With Action, Along With The Inward Attitude Of One’s Heart, By The One Son Abel, Proved To Be Acceptable.

  •  

  • God approved and accepted the one’s son’s offering and rejected the other.

  •  

  • Faith, Reaching Toward God Is The Avenue That Allows Communication With God;

  • Nevertheless, "Faith,’ In God Only, In Itself, Cannot Remove Sin’s Power Over  Individuals Lives. In Future Postings, A Discussion Of This Point Will Continue.

  •  

  • God Approved And Accepted The One Son’s Offering, it is safe to have assumed that God wasn’t looking only at the types and qualities of the offerings, although this in itself is most important; as we can read further in God’s revelation in "Offering Types."

  •  

  • God it seemed was looking at a certain quality within one’s heart, which we are unable to recognize. Even though, one can have all the outward trappings of a Christian Pastor, Theologian, or Lay Person.

  • God’s awareness; for the most part, is unnoticed by us.

  •  

  • The Bible Has many Stories Of It’s Biblical Leaders That God Has Used.

  •  

  • To Our Dismay, Many Lead Lives Of Disgrace At Times Including:

  • Murder

  • Adultery

  • Lying

  • Theft

  • Incest

  • Drunkenness

  •  

  • Yet, These Men Were Loyal To God In Certain Aspects Of Their Relationship To Him.

  •  

  • Sin’s Power; Was, And Is, The Controlling Power Over Man.

  •  

  • Later in Bible History We Have Enoch and Elijah who were taken by God.

  •  

  • Knowing that God doesn’t allow sin to reside in His Heavenly city.

  •  

  • God nevertheless, kept these two safe and under His protection.

  •  

  • Now these two, as well as all others,  from Adam to Jesus, who had their trust in God, and had accepted what God had revealed to all, in His prophecy throughout generations prior to the coming Messiah.

  •  

  • Had their hope rewarded in the coming Messiah "Jesus."

  •  

  • Able, Cain, Enoch, Elijah Made A Choice, As Well As  Many Others.

  •  

  • This Choice Was Made By Faith, In God’s Word About The Future Messiah Who Was Unknown To them.

  •  

  • This Messiah Was God Himself, Who then became Incarnate, in The God-man "Jesus."

  •  

  • These Choices Made By Earthly Men, While They Were Under The Controlling Power Of Sin.

  •  

  • Their Choices Where Made In Their Darken Sin State.

  •  

  • MADE IN FAITH

  •  

  • To God, An Offering By These Two Son’s; Cain and Abel, To God And His Promise To His Up-Coming Messiah, Who Would Crush The Power Of The Deceiver.

  •  

  •  

  • GOD

  •  

  • Eventually, it all begins in that we can’t understand God.

  • God’s thoughts and ideals are His and His alone, we are incapable in understanding them.

  • All that we realized of God has been inferred by His actions towards the world and it’s people.

  • The Bible lets us see the phenomenon of such doctrines as the Trinity, when God became flesh in Jesus.

  • The God-man Jesus was in fact purposed, for one act only, and that was to die as a sacrifice to the Father God in Heaven. 

  •  

  • Jesus, To Atone For Sin That Was Committed On Planet Earth.

  •  

  • The Father, Son, and Holy Spirit

  •  

  • The ideal I would like to discuss here is in regards to man reaching out to God while yet in the controlling sin and it’s power.

  •  

  • A way we could look at the words describing Cain and Abel’s action is to do a standard ethnology, separate verb tenses, along with markers. Eventually, this would give a clearer intent of the usages of the words used, that, along with similar parallel passages.

  •  

  • Therefore, let’s look at the story line into what the Bible says on a couple points…. 

  •  

  • God Took A Mass "earth," void of life, in darkness, and with water that covered all.

  • We then are able to read how our planet became inhabitable.

  • The Bible says God walk in the garden where Adam and Eve where. In fact, He even had conversations with them.

  • The Bible story unfolds, Adam and Eve disobeyed God, thus, they were now under the deceiver’s controlling  power which is called "sin."

  • They believed the deceiver instead of what God had said for them to do.

  • They, Adam and Eve were sent from the Garden.

  • God told the deceiver that His power would be totally crushed in the future.

  •  

  • As one reads further into the story we see the birth of the two son’s Cain and Abel.

  • A question raised is, that both son’s where aware of the necessity of making an offering to God.

  • Speculating, we can come up with some neat ideals as to why they did this, and what could have been their exact motivation.

  • Perhaps, their Mother and Father had a part in handing down this information to them?

  • Yet, we read of no repentance of Adam and Eve for their sin against God.

  • Adam and Eve made no offering to God for their trespasses. (sin)

  •  

  • LIFELINE

  •  

  • ALL MEN, Created man seems to have factor of conscious within oneself towards God. GOD HAS PLACED IT THERE, AND IT IS ACCEPTABLE TO HIM.

  • Why this is so, isn’t exactly understood, there is no direct information to this regard.

  • CAIN AND ABEL The one son’s offering is accepted by God and the other isn’t.

  • In man’s sin state he still has the capacity to do what is acceptable to God.

  • At this point in time in the Bible story, we are not fully aware of man’s sin condition and it’s affect to his heart and mind. Evidently,we will see it most clearly, in other biblical writings.

  •  

  • Hence, this time period of Cain and Abel, with their decision to make an offering to God, and consequently, both of them making it at the same time.

  • The offering, reflects an inward quality in man. A consciousness toward God, of a need of making an offering.

  • The two son’s, were they of the opinion to be on the right side with God?

  • I’m absolutely sure, they were aware of their parents error.

  •  

  • Since we have no evidence that their Father or Mother ever turn back to God, or to asked for forgiveness. Neither or they remembered in a positive faith building way. Strangely scripture is silent on their personal actions of repentance. 

  •  

  • Could one inferred that the son’s wanted to be held by their own actions and not those of their parents?

  •  

  • LIFELINE

  •  

  • Thus, Even While In The Curse Of Sin’s Power, And It’s Degradation, The individual is enabled to do only  one thing in his relationship towards God and the is to reach out in Faith toward God, The life line that is inherited with in all.

  • There is no other way to the Father, "Faith" is exercised, not by what is given, though that is important, it’s not who or what one’s ancestry is, with these two being the Sons of God’s first created being, had no bearing.

  •  

  • What we know is that, they, were in the knowledge that in the future, God the "ALMIGHTY CREATOR," was sending one that was to redeemed mankind from the controlling power of Sin.    

  •  

  • This faith demonstrated, along with action, was a direct line to God, from man’s inward being.

  • This inward lifeline was breathed into mankind by God Himself at his creation, as part of his sustaining life.

  • A LIFELINE remains open, it remains open only to one thing though, and it is in FAITH TO GOD, OF THE NOW SENT SAVOR OF THE WORLD "JESUS," WHO HAS IN FACT TOTALLY CRUSHED THE POWER OF SIN, AND IT’S REBELLION TO GOD AND GOD’S AUTHORITY.

  •  

  • Man’s awareness of God is universal, however, only a heart set on God and His promise of Salvation through "Jesus" will enable that faith to lead to eternal salvation  by accepting God’s Messiah "Jesus."

  • As with Abel, one will need to put into actions one’s faith, by trusting only the "Bible" and God’s Christ, as the way of Salvation and to it’s heavenly home.

  • All things pertaining to God are by FAITH.

  •  

  • Norman Oetker Missionary

  • November 2008 Reynosa Mexico

  •  

  • God And Two Sons Norman Oetker English Class Reynosa Mae Hong Son Thailand Mexico St. Charles Missouri Hmong Missionary


“Jesus Birthday” Christmas 2008 Reynosa Mexico Norman Oetker .. English Class Reynosa Mae Hong Son Thailand Mexico St. Charles Missouri Hmong Missionary

2008 Christmas Reynosa Norman Oetker MEO L.A.M. Norman Oetker Missionary "The Light Amidst the Mong/MEO" Hmong Thailand, Reynosa Mexico, English Class, St. Charles Missouri US.

 WANTED… A WRITER FOR A BOOK ON MY LIFE AS A CHRISTIAN MISSIONARY

CONTACT: normanoetker@hotmail.com  October 2009

 
 
 
My Home Missionary Norman Oetker English Class Reynosa Mexico

THE WORLD WAS TO REJOICE AT THE BIRTH OF OUR SAVIOR!

And I Do Missionary Norman Oetker

 

Celebrating "Jesus"

Picture1816

This Is The Time Of Year That I And Millions of Others Celebrate the Birth Of "Jesus.

The Exact Year An Date Of Jesus Birth Aren’t Exactly Known.

Perhaps, What is Known For Sure Is That This Is The Time Of The year, That All Of The Peoples Of The World Realize, That This Is The Time Of A World-Wide Celebration Of The Birth Of "Jesus."

 

 

 

LUKE 2:4

4  And Joseph also went up from Galilee, out of the city of Nazareth, into Judaea, unto the city of David, which is called Bethlehem; (because he was of the house and lineage of David:)

5  To be taxed with Mary his espoused wife, being great with child.

6  And so it was, that, while they were there, the days were accomplished that she should be delivered.

7  And she brought forth her firstborn son, and wrapped him in swaddling clothes, and laid him in a manger; because there was no room for them in the inn.

8 ¶  And there were in the same country shepherds abiding in the field, keeping watch over their flock by night.

9  And, lo, the angel of the Lord came upon them, and the glory of the Lord shone round about them: and they were sore afraid.

10  And the angel said unto them, Fear not: for, behold, I bring you good tidings of great joy, which shall be to all people.

11  For unto you is born this day in the city of David a Saviour, which is Christ the Lord.

12  And this shall be a sign unto you; Ye shall find the babe wrapped in swaddling clothes, lying in a manger.

13  And suddenly there was with the angel a multitude of the heavenly host praising God, and saying,

14  Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, good will toward men.

15  And it came to pass, as the angels were gone away from them into heaven, the shepherds said one to another, Let us now go even unto Bethlehem, and see this thing which is come to pass, which the Lord hath made known unto us.

16  And they came with haste, and found Mary, and Joseph, and the babe lying in a manger.

17  And when they had seen it, they made known abroad the saying which was told them concerning this child.

18  And all they that heard it wondered at those things which were told them by the shepherds.

19  But Mary kept all these things, and pondered them in her heart.

20  And the shepherds returned, glorifying and praising God for all the things that they had heard and seen, as it was told unto them. ¶

 

 

 

 Picture1821

                  "JESUS"

  "For Unto Us A King Is Born."

Celebrating "Jesus" In My Home

Reynosa Mexico Norman Oetker Missionary

 

 

 

 

Picture1833                         "JESUS"

"For Let All That Have Breath Praise His name."

Reynosa Mexico Missionary Norman Oetker

 

 

 

 

 

 

"Jesus Birthday" Christmas 2008 Reynosa Mexico Norman Oetker .. English Class Reynosa Mae Hong Son Thailand Mexico St. Charles Missouri Hmong Missionary


Grace a Reply Norman Oetker .. English Class Reynosa Mae Hong Son Thailand Mexico St. Charles Missouri Hmong Missionary

Grace A Reply MEO L.A.M. Norman Oetker Missionary "The Light Amidst the Mong/MEO" Hmong Thailand, Reynosa Mexico, English Class, St. Charles Missouri US.

 WANTED… A WRITER FOR A BOOK ON MY LIFE AS A CHRISTIAN MISSIONARY

CONTACT: normanoetker@hotmail.com  October 2009

 
 
 

Missionary Norman Oetker English Class

Again, the "Atonement" here is the subject in it’s entirety and my comments revised.  

Philippians 1:6 Being confident of this very thing, that He who has begun a good work in you will complete it until the day of Jesus Christ.  

Norman Oetker Missionary My Comment On The Above October 08 

The statement above is about something that happened, and that which happened was the "Atonement." God’s Grace was active in bringing that individual  to the saving knowledge of Christ. And then- after that completed work of Atonement, completed work of Salvation by Grace, then that same Grace, that first drawled one will continue in that’s persons life.

Grace is not the Atonement, it does not complete the Atonement.

Grace enabled one to be sought after by the Father, this attribute is of the Father and Him alone.

Grace enables us to begin the journey to our heavenly city. We could not in our strength attain  in our intellect, and reasoning ability, of how this amazing process called Grace, from the mind of the Father could be accomplish in and to us.

If anything, our reasoning would only indicated how utterly worthless we are, sin’s darkness could never allow us a glimpse of Holy God. We could not bridge the gap, into the Father’s realm, without Him first extending to us that which He gives abundantly to all, that will receive it, that being His "Grace."  

Given  to us that are blacken through and through with guilt and condemnation.    

Grace leads to the singular and completed work of the Atonement, then that same grace will help us to allow Christ who dwells within to manifest himself in our daily lives.  

Our life began by Grace, continues in and by Grace, and I’m sure in that place where all is revealed, and we will stand before a glorious God indeed, forever as a testimony to the Father’s Grace, as well He will have as a testimony for all to look down into  and see of sin’s condemnation.  

Now, we return to the category we are calling "precious promises" (2 Peter 1:4).

Here we have a priceless one concerning God’s commitment to complete the wonderful work of salvation that He began at our new birth.  

Norman Oetker Missionary My Comment On The Above October 08 

"…to complete the work of salvation that He began at our new birth…" This is contrary to scripture. The Atonement was complete at the Cross Totally. Our "Atonement" is NOT an ongoing work. The Atonement was complete at the cross and the resurrection.  

If our faith is in Jesus Christ as our Lord and Savior, God has started a tremendous saving work on our behalf: "He who has begun a good work in you." 

Norman Oetker Missionary My Comment On The Above October 08

This thought is miss-applied. One is saved totally by a God’s Grace, the Atonement is complete. God’s Grace is drawing one to the cross through the Gospel message. 

The Atonement stands alone not a continual work by man’s effort.

As Grace Stands alone.

So the Atonement Stands alone.

There are so many practical applications that could be used, in the explanation of the intent of these passages, FOR EXAMPLE when something is made it is made only once, then there is an on going continual finishing applications and further, later on, restoration process’s to again bring out that, which it was meant to look like, that is in the finished look.

For sure, it is not saying to make the piece again, the making and finishing are two entirely different process’s.   

He has made us new creatures in His Son."Therefore, if anyone is in Christ, he is a new creation; old things have passed away; behold, all things have become new" (2 Corinthians 5:17).  

Norman Oetker Missionary My Comment On The Above October 08

The Word says we are COMPLETE in Christ. Not some on going process of ONE not quite being complete, and that man has a part in finally completing his own salvation, what a fallacy. WORKS, WORKS, WORKS.  

He has supplied us with immeasurable heavenly resources.

"Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who has blessed us with every spiritual blessing in the heavenly places in Christ" (Ephesians 1:3).

What a grand work has been started in us.  

Norman Oetker Missionary My Comment On The Above October 08

This is out of context, the work of Redemption has been applied, and complete, in Christ we are elevated as other heavenly creatures, this passage is not implying and on-going work of "Salvation." Again a miss-application, of God’s children. "Has been started," is a complete error, and misuse of scripture, in bending it to reinforce a false assumption.  

Yet, God’s saving work is "so great a salvation" (Hebrews 2:3).

Thus, whatever He has already been accomplished with us is only a part of the whole. 

Norman Oetker Missionary My Comment On The Above October 08

These are incredible statements, that God’s salvation plan is only partly complete. All one needs to do is to take this line thought to the next eventual step, and that is, that we need to do something to finish the plan of salvation in out life, that is just WRONG, WRONG, WRONG. It would not be wrong, if one has his own ideal of what he or she has been taught through erroneous applications of scriptures. 

Wherever we are in this glorious process, there is some completing work that God desires to do.  

Norman Oetker Missionary My Comment On The Above October 08

We are not in a glorious completion of our Salvation. The Atonement was complete.

The Reader needs to keep in mine that the writer first assumption is incorrect quote "God’s commitment to complete the wonderful work of salvation."  

He wants to bring into our understanding, our character, and our daily experience more of that which is fully ours in Christ.

Furthermore, our God wants us to be confident concerning this matter: "Being confident of this very thing."

As noted in our previous meditation, God does not want people living in self-confidence.  

Norman Oetker Missionary My Comment On The Above October 08

This self-confidence statement is again so far removed, it contradicts his writings that being the implication, that our salvation (His Words) in not complete and that, we have to do something for it to be complete ERROR.  

That misplaced trust is just another form of pride.

This does not mean that we Christians are to be without confidence in our lives.

It does mean that all of our confidence is to be placed in the Lord.  

Norman Oetker Missionary My Comment On The Above October 08

If one will in fact believe that he indeed is completely Saved, and is in fact, God’s son. WOW!  

"And we have such trust [confidence] through Christ toward God" (2 Corinthians 3:4).

Our Lord wants us to have strong assurance in Him that He will complete this work in us.

 

Norman Oetker Missionary My Comment On The Above October 08

Again, the author’s point is ERROR, that which God has stated from the beginning he will complete, however, again and again his implication is about how your salvation was not complete in the beginning, simply error, in biblical 101 basics.  

Also remember, this saving work of God is done within our lives: "He who has begun a good work in you will complete it. 

Norman Oetker Missionary My Comment On The Above October 08

It is plain as we read his writings and miss-applications of scriptures, that he believes he is not totally saved when he gave his heart to Jesus. Maybe he’s not saved. 

The Lord has established an eternal position for us with Him in heavenly places: "and raised us up together, and made us sit together in the heavenly places in Christ Jesus" (Ephesians 2:6).

Yet, He wants to effect a godly walk for us here on earth.  

Norman Oetker Missionary My Comment On The Above October 08

The implication again is that one’s Atonement, one’s Salvation experience, is not complete and that it will be a on going work of completion.  

Walk worthy of the calling with which you were called" (Ephesians 4:1).

This walk is not based upon human theories of behavior modification.

Our Lord Himself develops this in and through our hearts.

"Now may the God of peace…make you complete in every good work to do His will, working in you what is well pleasing in His sight" (Hebrews 13:20-21).  

Norman Oetker Missionary My Comment On The Above October 08

My comments on the above author’s errors- which I’ve tried to demonstrate more clearly and I believe that they are in fact incorrect. 

The authors erroneous assumptions and miss-application of scriptures in regards to one’s Atonement, one’s Salvation, that it is not complete, is "ERROR."

Your mentioning of the subject of Grace, is a totally different subject, my thoughts and comments in part, on that are in a partial related article on my homepage.

Your mentioning of Grace in your email is off point, and a total avoidance of the subject matter in which I raised.

My concerns which I believe are correct are about the subject above. 

Grace a Reply Norman Oetker .. English Class Reynosa Mae Hong Son Thailand Mexico St. Charles Missouri Hmong Missionary


Man On Cross Salvation Is Of God Norman Oetker.. English Class Reynosa Mae Hong Son Thailand Mexico St. Charles Missouri Hmong Missionary

 Our Atonement-Salvation Is Complete And Entire Through God’s Design.  MEO L.A.M. Norman Oetker Missionary "The Light Amidst the Mong/MEO" Hmong Thailand, Reynosa Mexico, English Class, St. Charles Missouri US.

 WANTED… A WRITER FOR A BOOK ON MY LIFE AS A CHRISTIAN MISSIONARY

CONTACT: normanoetker@hotmail.com  October 2009

 
 
 

November 2008 Norman Oetker English Class Reynosa Mexico Missionary

 

  • Our Atonement-Salvation is complete and entire through God’s design.  

  • Through the Atoning work of the Cross, through God’s Incarnate "Jesus," Man’s Atonement, Man’s "Salvation," is a complete. Christ Atoning Work Was Unto God, The Father, For Sin’s Of The World.  

  • The Atonement was made to God the Father. The work of the ‘Cross,’ is to the Father. Man has no part in the Atoning work of the Father.

  • Man cannot complete the ‘Atonement/Salvation’ within their own lives.

  • If man could could complete ‘God’s Atonement’, he would be equal with God.

  • The reference of Phil 1:6 is not talking about the Atonement.

  • The reference of 2 Peter 1:4, the devotional comment is taken out of context. The Atonement stands alone to the ‘Father.’

  • "Jesus Atoned."

  • A finish work of ‘Grace.’ Man Benefits’.

  • The devotional implies that ‘Salvation’ is continual.

  •  

  • This is error.

  •  

  • The ‘Atonement’ was complete in itself. There is no additional work of God to be done in a person life to complete the "Atonement, Man’s Salvation."   

  • 2 Cor 5:17 States the ‘Atonement’ is complete, not a continual work in one’s life. The writer is in error in his implication.

  • Eph 1:3  God’s ‘Atonement, man’s Salvation’ by Grace is complete.

  • Heb 2:3 God’s completed ‘Atonement, Man’s Salvation.’

  • The author’s statement that…’God is trying to complete man’s ‘Atonement, his Salvation’ is in error.

  •  

  • The ‘Atonement is complete.’

  •  

  • Again, the writer is is incorrect, in stating that God’s ‘Atonement, man’s Salvation’ is a continual work, and is trying to complete it within one’s life.

  •  

  • The ‘Completed Atoning Work of the Cross, was to the Father.’

  • The benefits- of this completed work- are available to all.

  • Again, the saving work of God, is not done, in a continual process within one’s life.  "The Atonement is Complete."

  • Finally, Heb 13: 20-21 is taken totally out of context, this, and other comments within the devotional imply that, ‘man additional actions are required, to complete the Atonement, man’s salvation, within their lives.

Man On Cross Salvation Is Of God Norman Oetker.. English Class Reynosa Mae Hong Son Thailand Mexico St. Charles Missouri Hmong Missionary


No Food Reynosa Norman .. Oetker English Class Reynosa Mexico Mae Hong Son Thailand Mexico St. Charles Missouri Hmong Missionary

No Food MEO L.A.M. Norman Oetker Missionary "The Light Amidst the Mong/MEO" Hmong Thailand, Reynosa Mexico, English Class, St. Charles Missouri US.

 WANTED… A WRITER FOR A BOOK ON MY LIFE AS A CHRISTIAN MISSIONARY

CONTACT: normanoetker@hotmail.com  October 2009

 
 
 
 
  • In Spanish And In English See Story Below
  • The Story Below Is Told In Part From Missionary Hudson Taylor.
  • His Experience Of Trusting God As the Bible Says, Has Helped Me Here In Mexico When No Food was Available, As Well As Overseas In Asia.
  • The Reward Of Waiting On God, Bore It’s Fruit, The Sweet Taste Is Cherished Years Thereafter. When Similar Times Come Currently- In Doing The Lord’s Work, With It’s Difficulties and Yes, Even the very agonizing at times Discipline Of "Waiting upon the Lord In Secret."  This Waiting Strengthen One’s Resolved. For As Fasting Strengthens One’s Faith, Trusting During A Trial So Likewise Fortifies One Against The Attacks Of The Adversary.
  • Missionary Norman Oetker Reynosa Mexico

 

  • Hudson Taylor missionary in China.
  • Two weeks before he was to marry Maria, a situation came up to affirm Maria’s willingness to marry Hudson.
  • Hudson had resigned from the missionary group and started an independent mission work, trusting God for his support.
  • Maria would make the decision to marry Hudson, knowing that sometimes they would have to endure financial sacrifice.
  • Hudson and another missionary family had invited Maria and her friend to their house in China, for dinner weeks before. That day came and Hudson had no money or food in his house, all that he had, was a package of Chocolate.
  • The mail had come and there was no money in the mail.
  • Hudson only had a penny (one pesos). Hudson and the other missionaries prayed to God for help, and nothing happened, so they decided to sell a little stove (estuva) to buy food, however, they could not cross the small river to sell the stove, so they return home and continued to pray.
  • Late that day they hear an excited friend say that there was some mail that had arrived unexpectedly, and in the mail was letter with some money.
  • Hudson told Maria everything that had happened that day. Hudson told Maria that there could be many difficult times ahead, yet Maria assured Hudson, that she to, was trusting and believing God for everything. 

 

 

  • Hudson Taylor, misionero en China.
  • Dos semanas antes de que fuera a casarse con María, una situación que llegó hasta afirmar Maria estaba dispuesta a casarse con Hudson.
  • Hudson había dimitido de la misionera grupo y comenzó una misión independiente de trabajo, confiando en Dios por su apoyo.
  • Maria haría la decisión de casarse con Hudson, a sabiendas de que a veces tendrán que soportar el sacrificio financiero.
  • Hudson y otro misionero familia había invitado a María y su amiga a su casa en China.para la cena semanas antes.
  • Ese día llegó y Hudson no tenía dinero o comida en su casa, todo lo que había, era un paquete de chocolate.
  • El correo ha llegado y no había dinero en el correo.
  • Hudson sólo había un centavo (un pesos).
  • Hudson y los otros misioneros oró a Dios por ayuda, y no pasó nada, por lo que decidió vender un poco de estufa (estuva) para comprar alimentos, sin embargo, no podían cruzar el pequeño río para vender la estufa, por lo que regresar a su casa y continuó a orar.
  • A fines de ese día se escuchará un emocionado amigo decir que, hubo algunos mail, que había llegado inesperadamente, y en el correo, fue una carta con un poco de dinero.
  • Hudson le dijo a Maria todo lo que había sucedido ese día.
  • Hudson le dijo a Maria que no puede ser, muchas veces difficuls por delante, pero aseguró María de Hudson, que a ella, es creer y confiar en Dios para everthing.

     

    No Food Reynosa Norman Oetker English Class Reynosa Mexico Mae Hong Son Thailand Mexico St. Charles Missouri Hmong Missionary


  • Man Helped God In Salvation? Norman Oetker English Class Reynosa Mae Hong Son Thailand Mexico St. Charles Missouri Hmong Missionary.

    • MEO L.A.M. Norman Oetker Missionary "The Light Amidst the Mong/MEO" Hmong Thailand, Reynosa Mexico, English Class, St. Charles Missouri US.

       WANTED… A WRITER FOR A BOOK ON MY LIFE AS A CHRISTIAN MISSIONARY

      CONTACT: normanoetker@hotmail.com  October 2009

       
       

    • November 2008
    • Norman Oetker English Class Reynosa Mexico
    • Our Atonement-Salvation is complete and entire through God’s design, Not Through The Help Of Man.
    • Through the Atonement work of the Cross, through God’s Incarnate ‘Jesus’, Man’s Atonement, man’s ‘Salvation,’ is a complete, and an entire work of God’s ‘Grace.’ Grace is God’s Favor Towards Man.
    • The Atonement was made to God the Father. The work of the ‘Cross,’ is to the Father. Jesus’s Sacrificial Death was For The Sin’s Of the World. Man has no part in the Atoning work of the Father and to the Father.
    • Man cannot complete the ‘Atonement-Salvation’ within their own lives.
      If man could could complete ‘God’s Atonement’, he would be equal with God.
    • The reference of Phil 1:6 is not talking about the Atonement.
    • The reference of 2 Peter 1:4, the devotional comment is taken out of context. The Atonement stands alone to the ‘Father.’ "Jesus Atoned."
    • A finish work of ‘Grace.’ Man Benefits.
    • The devotional implies that ‘Salvation’ is continual. This is error.
      The ‘Atonement’ was complete in itself. There is no additional work of God to be done in a person life to complete the "Atonement, Man’s Salvation."   
    • 2 Cor 5:17 States the ‘Atonement’ is complete, not a continual work in one’s life. The writer is in error in his implication.
    • Eph 1:3  God’s ‘Atonement, man’s Salvation’ by Grace is complete.
    • Heb 2:3 God’s completed Atonement, man’s Salvation.
    • The author’s statement that…God is trying to complete man’s Atonement, his Salvation is in error. The Atonement is complete.
    • Again, the writer is is incorrect, in stating that God’s Atonement, man’s Salvation is a continual work, and is trying to complete it within one’s life.
    • The Completed Atoning Work of the Cross, was to the Father. The benefits- of this completed work- are available to all.
    • Again, the saving work of God, is not done, in a continual process within one’s life.  "The Atonement is Complete."
    • Finally, Heb 13: 20-21 is taken totally out of context, this, and other comments within the devotional imply that, man additional actions are required, to complete the Atonement, man’s salvation, within their lives.
    • This Is in Error The Atonement-Salvation for man was complete In Jesus’s death on the Cross, Jesus Atoned to God For the Sin’s of the World.
    • Man Help God In Salvation? Norman Oetker English Class Reynosa Mae Hong Son Thailand Mexico St. Charles Missouri Hmong Missionary.


    Higher Criticism What Is It? Norman Oetker .. English Class Reynosa Mae Hong Son Thailand Mexico St. Charles Missouri Hmong Missionary

     MEO L.A.M. Norman Oetker Missionary "The Light Amidst the Mong/MEO" Hmong Thailand, Reynosa Mexico, English Class, St. Charles Missouri US.

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    November 2008 Reynosa Mexico

    Norman Oetker English Class Reynosa Mexico

    Below are more thoughts by other writer’s on the concepts of Higher Criticism.

     

    • By Studying A Well-Established Tradition such as the Exodus, it is possible to see the different emphases placed upon it by historians, psalmists, and apostles.
    • An interesting though rather speculative study is redaction criticism, which arose from form criticism and investigates the editorial motiviation involved in the production of a work with particular reference to the viewpoint expressed.
    • Thus the chronicler was concerned almost exclusively with the Davidic succession and its continuity in postexilic Judea and, as a result, developed a theology of history that was unique in antiquity.
    • Again, John’s Gospel deals selectively with the data of Christ’s life and presents them theologically to the readers so that they might be saved.
    • This standpoint makes the Fourth Gospel distinctive as an evangelistic document.
    • While the processes of structuralism are interpreted in a variety of ways, its basic concept appears to be that form and content are so firmly united that the latter cannot be understood properly unless the significance of the former is grasped clearly.
    • This reinforces the values of form criticism, and prevents the truth of God from being considered as a purely abstract concept.
    • As with other disciplines, higher criticism needs to be handled carefully because of the ease with which results can be obtained by pure speculation in the absence of external data.
    • Since the Reformation, biblical study has been littered with unsubstantiated suppositions, hypotheses, and theories, not infrequently based upon some concept of organic evolution.
    • This can be seen clearly in the work of nineteenth century liberal scholars, whose studies were generally so lacking in external controls, such as archaeological evidence, that unwarranted liberties were taken with both biblical interpretation and historical processes.
    • Because these approaches went far beyond the available relevant evidence in the conclusions adopted, they also cast doubt upon the reliability of the method involved.
    • Responsible critical scholarship will resist such tendencies, partly because the purely speculative can be so easily demolished by opposing factual evidence, but more particularly because the integrity of the Scriptures is thereby seriously undermined. R. K. HARRISON

     

    • See also TUBINGEN SCHOOL; ENLIGHTENMENT, THE; INTERPRETATION OF THE BIBLE.
    •  
    • Bibliography. E. J. Young, Introduction to the OT; R. K. Harrison, Introduction to the OT;D. Guthrie, NT Introduction; G. L. Archer, ZPEB, I, 584-90; R. K. Harrison et al., Biblical Criticism: Historical, Literary and Textual.
    • Higher Criticism
    • "Quote"
    • As with other disciplines, higher criticism needs to be handled carefully because of the ease with which results can be obtained by pure speculation in the absence of external data.
    • Since the Reformation, biblical study has been littered with unsubstantiated suppositions, hypotheses, and theories, not infrequently based upon some concept of organic evolution.
    • This can be seen clearly in the work of nineteenth century liberal scholars, whose studies were generally so lacking in external controls, such as archaeological evidence, that unwarranted liberties were taken with both biblical interpretation and historical processes.
    • Because these approaches went far beyond the available relevant evidence in the conclusions adopted, they also cast doubt upon the reliability of the method involved.
    • Responsible critical scholarship will resist such tendencies, partly because the purely speculative can be so easily demolished by opposing factual evidence, but more particularly because the integrity of the Scriptures is thereby seriously undermined. R. K. HARRISON

     

    • Higher Criticism
    • Text:  This term describes the study of Scripture from the standpoint of literature, as opposed to "lower criticism," which deals with the text of Scripture and its transmission.
    • Higher criticism thus has three main concerns: (a) detecting the presence of underlying literary sources in a work; (b) identifying the literary types (Gattungen) that make up the composition; and (c) conjecturing on matters of authorship and date.
    • The term "higher criticsm" might seem to carry either a mystic or a sinister meaning, but it is in fact a process that all scholars follow to varying degrees.
    • In order to obtain a proper understanding of the nature of biblical writings it is important to investigate the character of the sources.
    • Sometimes this brings history to bear upon the work, as in the book of Ezra, where a section of the edict of Cyrus liberating captive peoples in Babylonia in 538 B.C. is quoted (Ezra 1:2-4).
    • In the same book, a state document in Aramaic which gave instructions about the rebuilding of the Jerusalem temple (Ezra 6:3-5) was recovered after a search of the archives, and found to have been written at Cyrus’s command also.
    • This memorandum supported Jewish claims that the temple was being rebuilt by royal authority.
    • The recognition of various types of literature is also important because they can be compared with secular counterparts.
    • Thus OT legal enactments often have much in common with those of other Near Eastern nations, while the NT letters can be better understood by comparison with what is known about the form, style, and language of first century A.D. secular letters.
    • The fact that a work is ascribed to an author need not mean that it was written by that person.
    • Thus the Assumption of Moses, while seeming to come from an ancient, reputable author, proves on examination to be early first century A.D. in date, and therefore its contents and purpose must be judged accordingly.
    • Several other approaches have developed to assist the scholar in the use of higher criticism.
    • One is form criticism, which encourages the recognition of literary units according to their form.
    • This is helpful in studying the parables, miracles, and sayings of Christ, for example, or in the recognition that the Fourth Gospel is written in the form of an ancient Babylonian tablet, complete with title, text, and colophon.
    • A close form critical examination of Genesis indicates that chapters 1-36 comprise eleven distinct sections marked off by the phrase "these are the generations of," and this material also appears in traditional Babylonian tablet form.
    • Norman Oetker .. English Class Reynosa Mae Hong Son Thailand Mexico St. Charles Missouri Hmong Missionary

    Jesus Yes! But, No Bible! Norman Oetker .. English Class Reynosa Mae Hong Son Thailand Mexico St. Charles Missouri Hmong Missionary.

    Jesus Yes MEO L.A.M. Norman Oetker Missionary "The Light Amidst the Mong/MEO" Hmong Thailand, Reynosa Mexico, English Class, St. Charles Missouri US.

     WANTED… A WRITER FOR A BOOK ON MY LIFE AS A CHRISTIAN MISSIONARY

    CONTACT: normanoetker@hotmail.com  October 2009

     
     
     
    • Oh! Yes! Yes! We believe In Jesus, We Just Don’t Believe The Bible Is Inspired.
    • We have Our Own Belief’s And Cultural Practices, That We Considered Our Cultural Norms.
    • They Are The Primary Guide For Our Culture And, The Rule For Our Everyday Life.
    • NOT THE BIBLE!
    • Our Traditions, Interpretation, Our Cultural Belief’s Are Our Spiritual Guide. 
    • The Rejecting Of The Bible Words Of Jesus, the Apostles and Others.
    • The Rejecting Of Bible Inspiration Isn’t Something New, It Is The Primary Strategy Of The Prince of Darkness, The Christians Adversary, This Prince Wants To Confuse And Guide The Unsuspecting Into The Way Of Error And Fallacy.
    • This Same Error Pattern Has Been Working Through-out History.
    • All Who Reject Bible Inspiration! Reject It’s  "Primary Truth,"
    • Which Is That, "The Only Way To Heaven Is Through "Jesus Christ."
    • There seems to be a pattern quite unremarkable, which has been accepted as the norm, however,  when this pattern’s source identity is revealed by it’s prime modus operand a, what is and has been the result?
    • That Result,  Will Be For One To Reject Bible Inspiration, Or Holding One’s Traditions, And Personal Belief’s, As Equal To The Bible.
    • Which Is Error, A Fallacy.
    • Let’s explore.
    • We begin with an article in Elwell’s Evangelical Dictionary on Asian Theology, this is an example of some very progressive Asian theology thoughts, from a number of different sources from the 60’s to the 80’s.

     

    • Elwell’s Evangelical Dictionary
      Asian Theology
    • Text:  "Theological ideas are created on the European continent, corrected in England, corrupted in America, and crammed into Asia," said one theologian. Because of rising nationalism and reassertion of traditional values in Asia, shoving "the white man’s Christianity" upon Asians is no longer advisable.
    • In order to understand Asian theology one must examine distinctions between Eastern and Western cultures. Since the end of World War II, Asian theologians have been seeking liberation from Western theologies in order to make the gospel more relevant to their own life situations.
    • Historically, the development of Asian theology is closely related to the development of indigenization in the early twentieth century and to the recent development of the concept of contextualization in missions. The International Missionary Council in Jerusalem in 1930 stressed that the Christian message must be expressed in national and cultural patterns with liturgy, church music, dance, drama, and building structures accentuating national features. This emphasis on using indigenous art forms and structures was carried over into the area of theology.
    • (Elwell’s Evangelical Dictionary cont.)
    • For example, Kanzo Uchimura, founder of a noted Non-Church Movement in Japan, emphasized a Japanese theology: "If Christianity is literally just one, then what a monotonous religion it is." He stated that just as there are German, English, Dutch, and American theologies, Japan should have a Japanese theology. He wanted Christianity expressed from the viewpoint of the Japanese; he wanted a Japanese Christianity.
    • In the early 1970s the Theological Education Fund introduced a new term, "contextualization," during the Third Mandate Period (1972-77).
    • The concept of indigenization was taken one step further by applying it in the area of mission, theological approach, and educational method and structure. Contextualization takes into account the processes of secularity, technology, and the struggles for human justice which characterize the history of nations in Asia. Asian theologians, therefore, have used the concepts of indigenization and contextualization to justify the development of Asian theologies.
    • Many theologians argue that God’s revelation came to us in the Scriptures through a specific cultural form, such as in the NT when God used the Jewish and hellenistic cultures to record his revelation.
    • Therefore the gospel must also be translated today into the particular forms of Asian cultures, and consequently numerous Asian theologies claim to represent
    • Asian cultural forms:
    • pain of God theology (Japan),
      water buffalo theology (Thailand),
      third-eye theology (for the Chinese),
      minjung theology (Korea),
      theology of change (Taiwan),
    • (Elwell’s Evangelical Dictionary cont.)
    • and a score of other national theologies such as
      Indian theology,
      Burmese theology,
      and Sri Lanka theology.
    • The proliferation of Asian theologies has escalated markedly since the 1960s and will continue to multiply in the future. This will undoubtedly produce enormous impact on as well as conflict and confusion in theological institutions and Christian churches in Asia.
    • The major proponents of Asian theology have been liberal theologians of mainline denominational seminaries. An increasing number of evangelical theologians have sharply reacted against the concept of Asian theology. Other evangelicals are insisting on the necessity of it.
    • Due to the existence of very divergent religious cultures in Asia, the content of Asian theology is also diversified. It can be classified in four main areas:
    •     (1) syncretistic theology,
          (2) accommodation theology,
          (3) situational theology, and
          (4) biblical theology which is relevant to Asian needs.
    • 1.     Syncretistic Theology.
    • Some Christian theologians and other religious thinkers have tried to syncretize Christianity with a national religion (Hinduism, Buddhism, or Islam) in an attempt to contextualize theology into the national situation.
    • The Programme Unit on Faith and Witness of the World Council of
    • Churches (WCC) has sponsored a number of religious dialogues with the leaders of other living religions. Many of these dialogues have resulted in a mutual acceptance of each other’s beliefs.
    • The scope of Hinduism and Buddhism is large enough to accommodate all other religions including Christianity. Sri Ramakrishna, founder of the Ramakrishna Mission, meditated on Christ, recognized Christ’s divinity as an avatar (incarnation) of the Supreme like Krishna and Buddha, and encourages his disciples to worship Christ.
    • The idea of the cosmic Christ which was emphasized during the WCC Assembly in New Delhi in 1961 has become prominent among liberal theologians in India. Raymond Panikkar in his book The Unknown Christ of Hinduism stresses that Christ already indwells the heart of a Hindu and that the mission of the church is not to bring Christ to the Hindu but to bring Christ out of him.
    • Klaus Klostermaier, a Roman Catholic theologian from German, visited Vrindaban, one of the Hindu sacred places in India, to have dialogue with Hindu gurus. After his spiritual experiences with Hindu scholars he testified, "The more I learned of Hinduism, the more surprised I grew that our theology does not offer anything essentially new to the Hindu."
    • M. M. Thomas, a prominent church leader both in India and in the WCC, expanded the cosmic Christ into a form of secular humanism.
    • He interpreted salvation as man finding his true humanness so that it is no longer suppressed by social injustice, war, and poverty.
    • Thomas said, "I cannot see any difference between the accepted missionary goal of a Christian Church expressing Christ in terms of the contemporary Hindu thought and life patterns and a Christ centered Hindu Church of Christ which transforms Hindu thought and life patterns within."
    • (Elwell’s Evangelical Dictionary cont.)
    • 2.     Accommodation Theology.
      Accommodation is another subtle attempt to contextualize theology in Asia. Just as a hotel or a family accommodates a guest, so theological accommodation considers prevailing customs and religious practices of another culture and accommodates good ideas from other religions. Christian attempts to accommodate other religious ideas are observable particularly in Buddhist countries.
    • The Thailand Bible Society selected the word dharma (law, duty, virtue, teaching, gospel) for the word Logos in John 1:1, because the dharma in Thai Buddhist culture is as meaningful as the Logos in the hellenistic world of NT times. In the same way Matteo Ricci, Roman Catholic Jesuit missionary to China in the sixteenth century, chose the words Tien Chu (Heavenly Lord) as the name for God because that was the popular Chinese Buddhist concept of God.
    • 3.    Water Buffalo Theology
      Kosume Koyama, a former Japanese missionary professor at Thailand Theological Seminary, in his Waterbuffalo Theology opposes syncretism for not doing justice to both parties. He advocates accommodation instead. Koyama believes that one cannot mix Aristotelian peper with Buddhist salt in the North Thailand theological "kitchen." One must, therefore, emphasize good "neighborology" rather than mere Christology, because Koyama believes that every religion has positive as well as negative points and that Thai Christians must accept the positive elements of Buddhism in Thailand in order to change their life style.
    • 4.    Third Dimensional Theology
    •     Third Eye Theology
    • Song Choan-Seng of Taiwan stresses a "third-dimensional theology" as seen from an Asian perspective in his book Third-Eye Theology. He says, for example, that just as the Holy Spirit works in a Westerner’s consciousness to bring about Christian conversion, so he works in the Zen Buddhists of Japan to bring about satori (enlightenment of the mind). Since the same Spirit is working in both religions, the objective of Christian missions should not be evangelization, but rather the interaction of Christian spirituality with Asian spirituality.
    • Two noted theologians in Sri Lanka have had a similar interest in accommodating Buddhist terminologies and ideas to Christian theology. D. T. Niles, one of the key leaders in the East Asia Christian Conference (now Christian Conference of Asia), did not hesitate to use word such as dharma and sangha to describe Christian "doctrines" and the "body of Christ" in his Buddhism and the Claims of Christ. Lyn de Siva, a Methodist minister in Sri Lanka, believes that the teaching of earlier Buddhism on the three basic characteristics of existence, anicca (impermanence), dukkha (suffering), and anatta (no-self), provides comprehensive analysis of the human predicament that can become a basis for Christian theology. Anicca affirms the status of constant change of all conditional things; dukkha affirms that attachment is the cause for human suffering; and anatta affirms no soul or any permanent entity in man. The concepts of anicca and dukkha can be easily accommodated into Christian theology, but anatta proves more difficult due to the biblical concept of immortality.
    • The accommodation of Asian religious terminologies and concepts such as dharma, Tien Chu, anicca, dukkha, and annatta into Christian theology can be accepted to a certain extent by many Christians as long as the biblical interpretation and meaning are added to such words and concepts.
    • Yet the question of where to draw the line between syncretism and accommodation depends on whether the person is willing to accept the unique revelation of God in Jesus Christ and in the Scriptures in his accommodation.
    • A person’s answer to a question such as "Do Buddhists need to be converted to Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of their sins?" will reveal whether or not he believes that Jesus Christ is the only way to God.
    • 5.     Situational Theology.
    • Another type of Asian theology derives directly from a particular situation. This situational theology may not be in agreement with the biblical and historical doctrines of the Christian church, and yet it speaks to concrete situations in Asia.
    • Kazoh Kitamori’s pain of God theology in Japan is an excellent illustration. He tried to demonstrate to the suffering people in Japan after their defeat in World War II that the God revealed in the Bible is the God of suffering and pain who could identify with the suffering Japanese.
    • 6. Minjung Theology
      The minjung theology (theology of the mass of the people) is another typical illustration. The main thrust of ecumenical theology today in Asia is toward the liberation of persons from social injustice, economic exploitation, political oppression, and racial discrimination.
    • The minjung theology is a Korean version of liberation theology and teaches that Jesus Christ is the liberator of these oppressed people.
      The major papers from a conference on the minjung theology, October 22-24, 1979, were edited by Yong-Bock Kim, director of the Christian Institute for the Study of Justice and Development in Seoul, and published as Minjung Theology: People as the Subjects of History.
    • Need for Biblically Oriented Asian Theology.
      Theology in Asia has been taught by Western missionaries. The West has its own theological formulations derived out of its own cultural background, Calvinism, Arminianism, death of God, etc.
    • Yet in Asia the circumstances facing Christians differ from the West.
    • Asian Christians must make their theologies relevant to their living situations in Asia.
    • Some of the main issues which Christians in Asia are facing today are communism, poverty, suffering, war, idolatry, demon possession, bribery, and cheating.
    • Most evangelical theologians see the value of Asian theology in allowing Asians to express their theological thoughts within their own contexts.
    • Nevertheless, they are also very apprehensive of the danger of syncretism and of minimizing fundamental scriptural teachings during the process of contextualization.
    • At the Sixth Asia Theological Association Consultation in Seoul, Korea, 1982, some eighty evangelical theologians discussed Asian theology and jointly produced a twenty-page Asian evangelical theologians’ declaration,
    • The Bible and Theology in Asia Today.
    • Although there is no particular Asian theology with an evangelical label which is widely accepted by evangelical theologians, this joint evangelical declaration has laid down a few guiding principles for theology in different religious contexts of Asia.
    • (1) The authority of the Bible is reaffirmed as the only infallible, inerrant Word of God: "The Bible, not theologians, is to speak in our theology."
    • (2) Jesus Christ, the only incarnate Son of God, is unique.
    • (3) Mission-centered theology aiming to communicate the gospel to the lost is the best protection against syncretism.
    • (4) Love should be the essential part of an Asian theology; only as Christians identify themselves with the needy do they contextualize the gospel.
    • Conclusion. The key issue in the whole argument around developing an Asian theology is whether in the process of contextualization the biblical and historical doctrines of the Christian church can be preserved without compromise.
    • An analogy can be made with carrying the ark of the covenant in the OT.
    • In OT times the ark was carried by ox cart.
    • Today in several Asian countries the ark would be carried by rickshaw, horse, motorcycle, or car. Yet the meaning of the ark must not be changed.
    • Many liberal theologians are trying to change the ark itself.
    • Asian Christians must listen to, evaluate, and be open-minded to different
    • Asian theological views on contextualization and yet, without compromise, be faithful to the gospel and proclaim it in love, as the apostle Paul exhorts: "Be on the alert, stand firm in the faith, act like men, be strong. Let all that you do be done in love" (I Cor. 16:13-14). B. R. RO
    • See also PAIN OF GOD THEOLOGY.
    • Bibliography. G. H. Anderson, ed., Asian Voices in Christian Theology; D. J. Elwood, ed., What Asian Christians Are Thinking; D. J. Elwood and E. P. Nakpil, eds., The Human and the Holy; K. Kitamori, Theology of the Pain of God; K. Klostermaier, Hindu and Christian in Vrindaban; C. Michalson, Japanese Contributions to Christian Theology.
    • Jesus Yes! But, No Bible! Norman Oetker English Class Reynosa Mae Hong Son Thailand Mexico St. Charles Missouri Hmong Missionary.

    Asian Theology MEO L.A.M. Norman Oetker Missionary “The Light Amidst the Mong/MEO” Hmong Thailand, Reynosa Mexico, English Class, St. Charles Missouri US.

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    The Call Is Clear Go Forth And Make Disciples! The Call Was And Is Not To The Few, But To All Who Call "Jesus Their Lord And Master." Generally, Christians Have Know Ideal Of What Other  Current Church Theologies Are. As One Reads The The Different Types Of Theologies For Other Parts Of the World.

    • I Would Asked That You keep In Mind, That The Point Of The Adversary Of Christianity Is To Dilute The Bible Until All Things Are Accepted: All Sorts Of Customs, Cultures, And Individual Practices, As Being Acceptable Cultural Norms.

    • There seems to be a pattern quite unremarkable, which has been accepted as the norm however,  when this pattern’s source identity is revealed- by it’s prime modus operand a- that then reveals what it is, and it’s result?

       

      • We begin with an article in Elwell’s Evangelical Dictionary on Asian Theology, this is an example of some very progressive Asian theology thoughts, from a number of different sources from the 60’s to the 80’s.

      • And Of Course It Goes Beyond Saying, That All Involved In These Articles "REJECT."

      • The Inspiration Of The Bible, As God being It’s only Author, Thus Inspired.

      • Norman Oetker English Class  Reynosa  Mexico Missionary 

         

        • Elwell’s Evangelical Dictionary

          Asian Theology

           

          • Text:  "Theological ideas are created on the European continent, corrected in England, corrupted in America, and crammed into Asia," said one theologian. Because of rising nationalism and reassertion of traditional values in Asia, shoving "the white man’s Christianity" upon Asians is no longer advisable.

             

            • In order to understand Asian theology one must examine distinctions between Eastern and Western cultures. Since the end of World War II, Asian theologians have been seeking liberation from Western theologies in order to make the gospel more relevant to their own life situations.

               

              • Historically, the development of Asian theology is closely related to the development of indigenization in the early twentieth century and to the recent development of the concept of contextualization in missions. The International Missionary Council in Jerusalem in 1930 stressed that the Christian message must be expressed in national and cultural patterns with liturgy, church music, dance, drama, and building structures accentuating national features. This emphasis on using indigenous art forms and structures was carried over into the area of theology.

                 

                • (Elwell’s Evangelical Dictionary cont.)

                   

                  •  For example, Kanzo Uchimura, founder of a noted Non-Church Movement in Japan, emphasized a Japanese theology: "If Christianity is literally just one, then what a monotonous religion it is." He stated that just as there are German, English, Dutch, and American theologies, Japan should have a Japanese theology. He wanted Christianity expressed from the viewpoint of the Japanese; he wanted a Japanese Christianity.

                     

                    • In the early 1970s the Theological Education Fund introduced a new term, "contextualization," during the Third Mandate Period (1972-77).

                    • The concept of indigenization was taken one step further by applying it in the area of mission, theological approach, and educational method and structure. Contextualization takes into account the processes of secularity, technology, and the struggles for human justice which characterize the history of nations in Asia. Asian theologians, therefore, have used the concepts of indigenization and contextualization to justify the development of Asian theologies.

                       

                      • Many theologians argue that God’s revelation came to us in the Scriptures through a specific cultural form, such as in the NT when God used the Jewish and hellenistic cultures to record his revelation.

                         

                        • Therefore the gospel must also be translated today into the particular forms of Asian cultures, and consequently numerous Asian theologies claim to represent

                           

                          • Asian cultural forms:

                              pain of God theology (Japan),

                              water buffalo theology (Thailand),

                              third-eye theology (for the Chinese),

                              minjung theology (Korea),

                              theology of change (Taiwan),

                               

                            • (Elwell’s Evangelical Dictionary cont.)

                            • and a score of other national theologies such as

                              Indian theology,

                              Burmese theology,

                              and Sri Lanka theology.

                            • The proliferation of Asian theologies has escalated markedly since the 1960s and will continue to multiply in the future. This will undoubtedly produce enormous impact on as well as conflict and confusion in theological institutions and Christian churches in Asia.

                            • The major proponents of Asian theology have been liberal theologians of mainline denominational seminaries. An increasing number of evangelical theologians have sharply reacted against the concept of Asian theology. Other evangelicals are insisting on the necessity of it.

                            • Due to the existence of very divergent religious cultures in Asia, the content of Asian theology is also diversified. It can be classified in four main areas:

                                    (1) syncretistic theology,

                                    (2) accommodation theology,

                                    (3) situational theology, and

                                    (4) biblical theology which is relevant to Asian needs.

                                 

                                1.     Syncretistic Theology.

                            • Some Christian theologians and other religious thinkers have tried to syncretize Christianity with a national religion (Hinduism, Buddhism, or Islam) in an attempt to contextualize theology into the national situation.

                            • The Programme Unit on Faith and Witness of the World Council of Churches (WCC) has sponsored a number of religious dialogues with the leaders of other living religions. Many of these dialogues have resulted in a mutual acceptance of each other’s beliefs.

                            • The scope of Hinduism and Buddhism is large enough to accommodate all other religions including Christianity. Sri Ramakrishna, founder of the Ramakrishna Mission, meditated on Christ, recognized Christ’s divinity as an avatar (incarnation) of the Supreme like Krishna and Buddha, and encourages his disciples to worship Christ.

                            • The idea of the cosmic Christ which was emphasized during the WCC Assembly in New Delhi in 1961 has become prominent among liberal theologians in India. Raymond Panikkar in his book The Unknown Christ of Hinduism stresses that Christ already indwells the heart of a Hindu and that the mission of the church is not to bring Christ to the Hindu but to bring Christ out of him.

                            • Klaus Klostermaier, a Roman Catholic theologian from German, visited Vrindaban, one of the Hindu sacred places in India, to have dialogue with Hindu gurus. After his spiritual experiences with Hindu scholars he testified, "The more I learned of Hinduism, the more surprised I grew that our theology does not offer anything essentially new to the Hindu."

                            • M. M. Thomas, a prominent church leader both in India and in the WCC, expanded the cosmic Christ into a form of secular humanism.

                            • He interpreted salvation as man finding his true humanness so that it is no longer suppressed by social injustice, war, and poverty.

                            • Thomas said, "I cannot see any difference between the accepted missionary goal of a Christian Church expressing Christ in terms of the contemporary Hindu thought and life patterns and a Christ centered Hindu Church of Christ which transforms Hindu thought and life patterns within."

                              (Elwell’s Evangelical Dictionary cont.)

                            • 2.     Accommodation Theology.

                              Accommodation is another subtle attempt to contextualize theology in Asia. Just as a hotel or a family accommodates a guest, so theological accommodation considers prevailing customs and religious practices of another culture and accommodates good ideas from other religions. Christian attempts to accommodate other religious ideas are observable particularly in Buddhist countries.

                            • The Thailand Bible Society selected the word dharma (law, duty, virtue, teaching, gospel) for the word Logos in John 1:1, because the dharma in Thai Buddhist culture is as meaningful as the Logos in the hellenistic world of NT times. In the same way Matteo Ricci, Roman Catholic Jesuit missionary to China in the sixteenth century, chose the words Tien Chu (Heavenly Lord) as the name for God because that was the popular Chinese Buddhist concept of God.

                            • 3.    Water Buffalo Theology

                              Kosume Koyama, a former Japanese missionary professor at Thailand Theological Seminary, in his Waterbuffalo Theology opposes syncretism for not doing justice to both parties. He advocates accommodation instead. Koyama believes that one cannot mix Aristotelian peper with Buddhist salt in the North Thailand theological "kitchen." One must, therefore, emphasize good "neighborology" rather than mere Christology, because Koyama believes that every religion has positive as well as negative points and that Thai Christians must accept the positive elements of Buddhism in Thailand in order to change their life style.

                            • 4.    Third Dimensional Theology

                                  Third Eye Theology

                              Song Choan-Seng of Taiwan stresses a "third-dimensional theology" as seen from an Asian perspective in his book Third-Eye Theology. He says, for example, that just as the Holy Spirit works in a Westerner’s consciousness to bring about Christian conversion, so he works in the Zen Buddhists of Japan to bring about satori (enlightenment of the mind). Since the same Spirit is working in both religions, the objective of Christian missions should not be evangelization, but rather the interaction of Christian spirituality with Asian spirituality.

                            • Two noted theologians in Sri Lanka have had a similar interest in accommodating Buddhist terminologies and ideas to Christian theology. D. T. Niles, one of the key leaders in the East Asia Christian Conference (now Christian Conference of Asia), did not hesitate to use word such as dharma and sangha to describe Christian "doctrines" and the "body of Christ" in his Buddhism and the Claims of Christ. Lyn de Siva, a Methodist minister in Sri Lanka, believes that the teaching of earlier Buddhism on the three basic characteristics of existence, anicca (impermanence), dukkha (suffering), and anatta (no-self), provides comprehensive analysis of the human predicament that can become a basis for Christian theology. Anicca affirms the status of constant change of all conditional things; dukkha affirms that attachment is the cause for human suffering; and anatta affirms no soul or any permanent entity in man. The concepts of anicca and dukkha can be easily accommodated into Christian theology, but anatta proves more difficult due to the biblical concept of immortality.

                            • The accommodation of Asian religious terminologies and concepts such as dharma, Tien Chu, anicca, dukkha, and annatta into Christian theology can be accepted to a certain extent by many Christians as long as the biblical interpretation and meaning are added to such words and concepts.

                            • Yet the question of where to draw the line between syncretism and accommodation depends on whether the person is willing to accept the unique revelation of God in Jesus Christ and in the Scriptures in his accommodation.

                            • A person’s answer to a question such as "Do Buddhists need to be converted to Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of their sins?" will reveal whether or not he believes that Jesus Christ is the only way to God.

                            • 5.     Situational Theology.

                              Another type of Asian theology derives directly from a particular situation. This situational theology may not be in agreement with the biblical and historical doctrines of the Christian church, and yet it speaks to concrete situations in Asia.

                              Kazoh Kitamori’s pain of God theology in Japan is an excellent illustration. He tried to demonstrate to the suffering people in Japan after their defeat in World War II that the God revealed in the Bible is the God of suffering and pain who could identify with the suffering Japanese.

                            • 6. Minjung Theology

                              The minjung theology (theology of the mass of the people) is another typical illustration. The main thrust of ecumenical theology today in Asia is toward the liberation of persons from social injustice, economic exploitation, political oppression, and racial discrimination.

                            • The minjung theology is a Korean version of liberation theology and teaches that Jesus Christ is the liberator of these oppressed people.

                              The major papers from a conference on the minjung theology, October 22-24, 1979, were edited by Yong-Bock Kim, director of the Christian Institute for the Study of Justice and Development in Seoul, and published as Minjung Theology: People as the Subjects of History.

                            • Need for Biblically Oriented Asian Theology.

                              Theology in Asia has been taught by Western missionaries. The West has its own theological formulations derived out of its own cultural background, Calvinism, Arminianism, death of God, etc.

                            • Yet in Asia the circumstances facing Christians differ from the West.

                            • Asian Christians must make their theologies relevant to their living situations in Asia.

                            • Some of the main issues which Christians in Asia are facing today are communism, poverty, suffering, war, idolatry, demon possession, bribery, and cheating.

                            • Most evangelical theologians see the value of Asian theology in allowing Asians to express their theological thoughts within their own contexts.

                            • Nevertheless, they are also very apprehensive of the danger of syncretism and of minimizing fundamental scriptural teachings during the process of contextualization.

                            • At the Sixth Asia Theological Association Consultation in Seoul, Korea, 1982, some eighty evangelical theologians discussed Asian theology and jointly produced a twenty-page Asian evangelical theologians’ declaration,

                            • The Bible and Theology in Asia Today.

                            • Although there is no particular Asian theology with an evangelical label which is widely accepted by evangelical theologians, this joint evangelical declaration has laid down a few guiding principles for theology in different religious contexts of Asia.

                            • (1) The authority of the Bible is reaffirmed as the only infallible, inerrant Word of God: "The Bible, not theologians, is to speak in our theology."

                            • (2) Jesus Christ, the only incarnate Son of God, is unique.

                            • (3) Mission-centered theology aiming to communicate the gospel to the lost is the best protection against syncretism.

                            • (4) Love should be the essential part of an Asian theology; only as Christians identify themselves with the needy do they contextualize the gospel.

                            • Conclusion. The key issue in the whole argument around developing an Asian theology is whether in the process of contextualization the biblical and historical doctrines of the Christian church can be preserved without compromise.

                            • An analogy can be made with carrying the ark of the covenant in the OT.

                            • In OT times the ark was carried by ox cart.

                            • Today in several Asian countries the ark would be carried by rickshaw, horse, motorcycle, or car. Yet the meaning of the ark must not be changed.

                            • Many liberal theologians are trying to change the ark itself.

                            • Asian Christians must listen to, evaluate, and be open-minded to different Asian theological views on contextualization and yet, without compromise, be faithful to the gospel and proclaim it in love, as the apostle Paul exhorts: "Be on the alert, stand firm in the faith, act like men, be strong. Let all that you do be done in love" (I Cor. 16:13-14). B. R. RO

                            •  
                            • See also PAIN OF GOD THEOLOGY.

                            •  
                            • Bibliography. G. H. Anderson, ed., Asian Voices in Christian Theology; D. J. Elwood, ed., What Asian Christians Are Thinking; D. J. Elwood and E. P. Nakpil, eds., The Human and the Holy; K. Kitamori, Theology of the Pain of God; K. Klostermaier, Hindu and Christian in Vrindaban; C. Michalson, Japanese Contributions to Christian Theology.

                               

                              Asian Theology MEO L.A.M. Norman Oetker Missionary "The Light Amidst the Mong/MEO" Hmong Thailand, Reynosa Mexico, English Class, St. Charles Missouri US.